Why do early adolescents bully? Exploring the influence of prestige norms on social and psychological motives to bully

Risultato della ricerca: Contributo in rivistaArticolo in rivistapeer review

38 Citazioni (Scopus)

Abstract

The present study examines psychological (e.g., Machiavellianism) and social (i.e., perceived popularity) motives for bullying, exploring the effects that classroom prestige norms for physical and relational aggression may have on these associations. A longitudinal multilevel study design was adopted, which included 978 5th to 7th graders from four Chilean schools. Participants were assessed three times over one year on self reports on bullying and Machiavellianism, and peer reports on popularity. Classroom prestige norms were calculated as the within classroom association between peer perceived coolness and aggression. Both Machiavellianism and perceived popularity were associated with bullying. However, hierarchical linear modeling analyses showed that Machiavellianism, but not perceived popularity, predicted bullying after controlling for baseline scores. Classroom prestige norms for relational aggression increased the association between Machiavellianism and bullying. Separate models were tested for boys and girls, showing no differences. Results are discussed in light of conceptual and methodological considerations.
Lingua originaleEnglish
pagine (da-a)45-56
Numero di pagine12
RivistaJournal of Adolescence
Volume46
DOI
Stato di pubblicazionePubblicato - 2016

Keywords

  • Machiavellianism
  • bullying
  • popularity
  • prestige norms

Fingerprint Entra nei temi di ricerca di 'Why do early adolescents bully? Exploring the influence of prestige norms on social and psychological motives to bully'. Insieme formano una fingerprint unica.

Cita questo