Translation Studies and XML: Biblical Translations in Byzantine Judaism, a Case Study

Eleonora Maria Gabriella Litta Modignani Picozzi, G. Julia Krivoruchko, Elena Pierazzo

Risultato della ricerca: Contributo in libroContributo a convegno

Abstract

All definitions of translation describe this process as involving two or more texts running in parallel that are considered to be, in a sense, equivalent to each other. When producing a translation, a source text is divided into syntactic units and each of them is then translated. The translation can be either literal, i.e. it mirrors the structure of the original text very closely, or free, i.e. it ignores the original structure and translates freely. Because languages diverge greatly in their syntax, the structure of a language A can not be fully mapped on a language B, since the outcome in B may be incomprehensible. Besides, cultures differ greatly as to the degree of freedom/literalness tolerated in translation.

Convegno

ConvegnoThe 20th Joint International Conference of the Association for Literary and Linguistic Computing, and the Association for Computers and the Humanities and The 1st Joint International Conference of the Association for Literary and Linguistic Computing, the Association for Computers and the Humanities, and the Society for Digital Humanities — Société pour l’étude des médias interactifs
CittàOulu, Finland
Periodo24/6/0829/6/08

Keywords

  • bible studies
  • judaism
  • translation studies
  • xml

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