The effect of dietary rumen-protected trans-10,cis-12 conjugated linoleic acid or a milk fat-depressing diet on energy metabolism, inflammation, and oxidative stress of dairy cows in early lactation

Erminio Trevisi, A. R. Bayat, A. Razzaghi, M. Sari, P. Kairenius, A. Tröscher, J. Vilkki

Risultato della ricerca: Contributo in rivistaArticolo in rivistapeer review

Abstract

The objective of this study was to determine the effects of milk fat depression induced by supplementing conjugated linoleic acid (CLA; trans-10,cis-12 and cis-9,trans-11 CLA) or feeding a higher starch and oil-containing diet (HSO) on metabolic changes in dairy cows after calving. The main hypothesis was that the 2 strategies to decrease milk fat yield could have different effects on performance, energy balance (EB), and inflammatory status in early lactation. Thirty-three Nordic Red dairy cows were used in a randomized block design from 1 to 112 d of lactation and fed one of the following treatments: control (CON), CLA-supplemented diet, or HSO diet. Dry matter intake and milk yield were measured daily whereas milk composition was measured weekly throughout the experiment. Nutrient digestibility, EB, and plasma hormones and metabolites were measured at 3, 7, 11, and 15 wk of lactation in respiration chambers. The HSO diet led to lower intakes of dry matter, neutral detergent fiber, and gross energy compared with CON and CLA diets. The CLA diet and especially the HSO diet resulted in lower energy-corrected milk yield during the first 7 wk of lactation than those fed CON. The EB was numerically higher for HSO and CLA diets compared with CON at wk 3 and 7. Plasma glucose concentration was higher by the CLA diet at wk 3 and by the HSO diet from wk 3 to 15 compared with CON. Plasma nonesterified fatty acids were higher at wk 3 in the CON group (indicating more lipid mobilization) but decreased thereafter to similar levels with the other groups. The HSO-fed cows had higher plasma ceruloplasmin, paraoxonase, and total bilirubin concentrations in the entire experiment and showed the highest levels of reactive oxygen metabolites. These results suggest an increased inflammatory and oxidative stress state in the HSO cows and probably different regulation of the innate immune system. This study provides evidence that milk fat depression induced by feeding HSO (as well as CLA) decreased milk fat secretion and improved EB compared with CON in early lactation. The increase in plasma glucose and paraoxonase levels with the HSO diet may imply a better ability of the liver to cope with the metabolic demand after parturition. However, the negative effect of HSO on feed intake, and the indication of increased inflammatory and oxidative stress warrant further studies before the HSO feeding strategy could be supported as an alternative to improve EB in early lactation.
Lingua originaleEnglish
pagine (da-a)3032-3048
Numero di pagine17
RivistaJournal of Dairy Science
Volume105
DOI
Stato di pubblicazionePubblicato - 2022

Keywords

  • conjugated linoleic acid
  • energy metabolism
  • milk fat depression
  • postpartum

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