Prevalence and Antimicrobial Resistance Patterns of Hospital Acquired Infections through the COVID-19 Pandemic: Real-Word Data from a Tertiary Urological Centre

Filippo Gavi, Barbara Fiori, Carlo Gandi, Marco Campetella, Riccardo Bientinesi, Filippo Marino, Daniele Fettucciari, Francesco Rossi, Stefano Moretto, Rita Murri, Francesco Pierconti, Marco Racioppi, Emilio Sacco

Risultato della ricerca: Contributo in rivistaArticolo in rivista

Abstract

Background: Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) remains a significant public health concern, closely linked to antibiotic overuse. During the COVID-19 pandemic, broad-spectrum antibiotics were frequently administered, potentially exacerbating AMR. This study aimed to assess AMR patterns in our urology department before and after the pandemic. Methods: The study encompassed patients admitted to our urology department from January 2016 to December 2022, with confirmed urinary tract infection, bloodstream infection, or wound infection based on positive culture results. Descriptive statistics, including mean, frequency, and percentage, summarized the data. Trends were analyzed using the Joinpoint Regression program. Results: A total of 506 patients were included. Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae displayed resistance rates of 65% and 62% to ciprofloxacin, respectively. K. pneumoniae showed resistance rates of 41% to piperacillin tazobactam and 3rd generation cephalosporins (3GC). Carbapenem resistance was observed in 38% of K. pneumoniae isolates. Additionally, 26% of E. coli, 26% of K. pneumoniae, and 59% of Proteus mirabilis isolates were ESBL-positive. Among gram+, 72% of Staphylococcus aureus isolates were MRSA, and 23% of Enterococcus faecium isolates were VRE. Trends in antimicrobial susceptibility patterns over the 7-year study period revealed a statistically significant decrease in E. coli resistance to amoxicillin-clavulanic acid (APC: -5.85; C.I. 95% p < 0.05) and a statistically significant increase in K. pneumoniae resistance to 3GC (APC: 9.93; CI (-19.9-14.4 95% p < 0.05). There were no statistically significant differences in AMR incidence pre- and post-COVID-19. Conclusion: The COVID-19 pandemic did not appear to influence the AMR incidence in our urology department. However, the overall prevalence of AMR and MDROs in our department remains high compared to European AMR.
Lingua originaleEnglish
pagine (da-a)N/A-N/A
RivistaJournal of Clinical Medicine
Volume12
DOI
Stato di pubblicazionePubblicato - 2023

Keywords

  • antibiotic resistance
  • antimicrobial stewardship
  • urinary tract infection

Fingerprint

Entra nei temi di ricerca di 'Prevalence and Antimicrobial Resistance Patterns of Hospital Acquired Infections through the COVID-19 Pandemic: Real-Word Data from a Tertiary Urological Centre'. Insieme formano una fingerprint unica.

Cita questo