Personal and general beliefs about decision-making in young, middle-age and older adults.

Paola Iannello, Alessandro Antonietti, Alessia Rosi, Elena Cavallini, C Hertzog

Risultato della ricerca: Contributo in libroContributo a convegno

Abstract

Several studies showed that people, and in particular older adults, tend to have negative beliefs about the effect of age on a wide variety of cognitive abilities, such as intelligence, general competence, and memory. Despite growing interest in decision-making ability in aging, no studies have examined age differences in beliefs about decision making. To fill this gap in literature, we investigated both beliefs about one’s decision-making competence (personal beliefs) and beliefs about the effect of aging on decision-making competence in general population (general beliefs) by comparing three age groups: young (age range 20-30), middle-age (age range 50-64), and older adults (age range 65-85). Two questionnaires on general and personal beliefs about decision-making (adapted from the Personal Beliefs about Memory and General Beliefs about Memory Instruments, Lineweaver & Hertzog, 1998) and a decision-making task were administered to participants. The three age groups differed in terms of decision-making performance, with older adults performed worse than middle-age and young adults. Results for the personal beliefs about decision-making indicated that older adults believed in more retrospective changes than middle-age and young adults. For prospective changes, young adults, compared to middle-age and older adults, reported improvement in decision-making ability over the next 10 years. Older and middle-age adults reported lower levels of control over decision-making ability than young adults. Regarding the general beliefs about decision making, participants of the three age groups believed in an improvement from age 20 to age 40 and in a decline from age 50. The pattern emerged from this analysis is an inverted U-shape. The present study is the first to explore age differences in both general and personal beliefs about decision-making competence and may contribute to improve knowledge about this ability in aging.
Lingua originaleEnglish
Titolo della pubblicazione ospiteCognitive Aging Conference 2018. Poster Abstract
Pagine271
Numero di pagine1
Stato di pubblicazionePubblicato - 2018
EventoCognitive Aging Conference - Atlanta, GA, USA
Durata: 3 mag 20186 mag 2018

Convegno

ConvegnoCognitive Aging Conference
CittàAtlanta, GA, USA
Periodo3/5/186/5/18

Keywords

  • Decision-making
  • Elderly
  • general beliefs
  • personal beliefs

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