Is malnutrition still a risk factor of postoperative complications in gastric cancer surgery?

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Abstract

The present study aimed at retrospectively evaluating the incidence of mortality and major and minor postoperative complications in patients who underwent surgery for gastric cancer between 2000 and 2006 stratified according to the preoperative percentage weight loss, serum albumin levels and body mass index (BMI). METHODS: One hundred and ninety-six patients affected by gastric cancer admitted to the Division of Digestive Surgery of the Catholic University of Rome between January 2000 and December 2006 were considered eligible and were included in the study. According to the weight loss, patients were divided into three groups: (1) 0-5%; (2) 5.1-10%; (3) >10%. On the basis of serum albumin levels, were divided into three groups: (1) <3.0 g/dl; (2) 3.0-3.4 g/dl; (3) >3.5 g/dl. According to BMI, were divided into four groups: (1) <18.5 kg/m(2); (2) 18.5-24.9 kg/m(2); (3) 25.0-29.9 kg/m(2); (4) >30.0 kg/m(2). Postoperative complications and mortality were reported. Complications were classified by objective criteria as major or minor, and as infectious or non-infectious. RESULTS: The postoperative mortality was 0%. Major infectious complications occurred in 20 patients (10.2%), major non-infectious in 18 (9.2%), minor infectious in 21 (10.7%), whereas minor non-infectious complications were absent. The rate of major infectious, major non-infectious and minor infectious postoperative complications was similar in patients with absent or light weight loss (8.8%, 8.8%, 10.6%, respectively), mild weight loss (15.3%, 11.5%, 9.6%, respectively), or severe weight loss (6.4%, 6.4%, 12.9%, respectively). Similarly, the rate of postoperative complications did not differ between patients with serum albumin <3.0 g/dl (10.8%, 8.1%, 8.1%, respectively); between 3.0 and 3.4 (8.8%, 13.3%, 17.7%, respectively) or > or =3.5 g/dl (10.5%, 7.9%, 8,7%, respectively). According to BMI, the rate of postoperative complications was: 11.7%, 5.8%, and 5.8% for BMI <18.5 kg/m(2); 9.4%, 8.2%, and 11.7% for BMI between 18.5 and 24.9 kg/m(2); 10.7%, 10.7%, and 9.2% for BMI between 25 and 29.9 kg/m(2); 10.3%, 10.3% and 13.7% for BMI >30 kg/m(2). Then, we evaluated the postoperative morbidity only in patients who underwent total gastrectomy or distal subtotal gastrectomy associated with extended lymphadenectomy. In this group of patients, the rate of postoperative complications was comparable in patients with 0-5% (8.8%, 7.7%, 10%, respectively), 5.1-10% (14.6%, 9.7%, 9.7%, respectively), and >10% (7.1%, 7.1%, 14.3%, respectively) weight loss. Also stratifying the patients according to the serum albumin levels, the rate of postoperative complications did not differ significantly (serum albumin <3.0 g/dl: 14.8%, 11.1%, 14.8%, respectively; serum albumin between 3.0 and 3.4 g/dl: 6.2%, 12.5%, 15.6%, respectively; serum albumin > or =3.5 g/dl: 10.4%, 5.8%, 7.0%, respectively). According to BMI, the rate of postoperative complications was: 7.6%, 0%, and 7.6% for BMI <18.5 kg/m(2); 9.5%, 9.5%, and 11.1% for BMI between 18.5 and 24.9 kg/m(2); 12.5%, 8.3%, and 10.4% for BMI between 25 and 29.9 kg/m(2); 9.5%, 9.5% and 9.5% for BMI >30 kg/m(2). CONCLUSION: The present study suggests that weight loss and hypoalbuminemia are not associated with an increased risk of mortality and morbidity in patients who underwent surgery for gastric cancer. This study may represent a stimulus for further studies aiming at evaluating the actual role of malnutrition in the development of postoperative complications in major abdominal surgery
Lingua originaleEnglish
pagine (da-a)398-407
Numero di pagine10
RivistaClinical Nutrition
Stato di pubblicazionePubblicato - 2008

Keywords

  • malnutrition gastric cancer

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