Is a brick (mattone) a big mad (matto)? What can alterate forms in Italian tell us about morphological parsing in children with dyslexia and skilled readers

Daniela Traficante, 27256, DI PSICOLOGIA FACOLTA', MILANO - Dipartimento di Psicologia, Marco Marelli, Claudio Luzzatti

Risultato della ricerca: Contributo in libroContributo a convegno

Abstract

We studied the role of semantic and morpho-orthographic information in word naming, by using Italian alterate forms. Thirty-two children with dyslexia and 64 same-age skilled readers (mean age: 134 months) were requested to read alterate nouns (e.g. librone, big book), fully parsable pseudo-alterate nouns (e.g. mattone, brick) and simple nouns ending with a pseudo-suffix (e.g. carbone, coal). Alterate nouns are read faster than simple words, while no difference emerged between the two types of simple words. Data are in favour of a dual-route access to morphologically complex words based on both whole word and morphemic constituents, linked to semantic representations.
Lingua originaleEnglish
Titolo della pubblicazione ospiteB.D.A. 8th International Conference, Dyslexia: Beyond Boundaries
Pagine1
Numero di pagine1
Stato di pubblicazionePubblicato - 2011
EventoB.D.A. 8th International Conference, Dyslexia: Beyond Boundaries - Harrogate (UK)
Durata: 2 giu 20114 giu 2011

Convegno

ConvegnoB.D.A. 8th International Conference, Dyslexia: Beyond Boundaries
CittàHarrogate (UK)
Periodo2/6/114/6/11

Keywords

  • developmental dyslexia
  • word morphology

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