Individual Differences in Cognitive Emotion Regulation: Implications for Subjective and Psychological Well-Being

Stefania Balzarotti, Daniela Villani, Federica Biassoni, A. Prunas, P. Velotti

Risultato della ricerca: Contributo in rivistaArticolo in rivistapeer review

67 Citazioni (Scopus)

Abstract

Although research has extensively examined the link between cognitive emotion regulation and psychopathological symptoms, scant attention has been given to the relationship between dispositional use of cognitive emotion regulation strategies and individuals’ positive functioning. In a cross-sectional study on 470 adults, we examined whether individual differences in the use of nine cognitive strategies were associated with subjective and psychological well-being. Results show that positive reappraisal and refocus on planning are positively related to both subjective and psychological well-being. Rumination, catastrophizing and self-blame are linked to poorer well-being, while positive refocusing, putting into perspective, and acceptance show few significant associations. These results suggest that cognitive emotion regulation strategies may be differently effective in promoting individual’s well-being.
Lingua originaleEnglish
pagine (da-a)125-143
Numero di pagine19
RivistaJournal of Happiness Studies
Volume17
DOI
Stato di pubblicazionePubblicato - 2016

Keywords

  • Cognitive emotion regulation
  • Psychological well-being
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Subjective well-being

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