Evolving frontiers in the treatment of periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, cervical adenitis (PFAPA) syndrome

Donato Rigante, Stefano Gentileschi, Antonio Vitale, Luca Cantarini

Risultato della ricerca: Contributo in rivistaArticolo in rivista

15 Citazioni (Scopus)

Abstract

Fevers recurring at a nearly predictable rate every 3–8 weeks are the signature symptom of periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, cervical adenitis (PFAPA) syndrome, an acquired autoinflammatory disorder which recurs in association with at least one sign among aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and/or cervical lymph node enlargement without clinical signs related to upper respiratory airways or other localized infections. The disease usually has a rather benign course, although it might relapse during adulthood after a spontaneous or treatment-induced resolution in childhood. The number of treatment choices currently available for PFAPA syndrome has grown in recent years, but data from clinical trials dedicated to this disorder are limited to small cohorts of patients or single case reports. The response of PFAPA patients to a single dose of corticosteroids is usually striking, while little data exist for treatment with cimetidine and colchicine. Preliminary interesting results have been published with regard to vitamin D supplementation in PFAPA syndrome, while inhibition of interleukin-1 might represent an intriguing treatment for PFAPA patients who have not responded to standard therapies. Tonsillectomy has been proven curative in many studies related to PFAPA syndrome, although the evidence of its efficacy is not widely shared by different specialists, including pediatricians, rheumatologists and otorhynolaryngologists.
Lingua originaleEnglish
pagine (da-a)444-447
Numero di pagine4
RivistaIsrael Medical Association Journal
Volume2017
Stato di pubblicazionePubblicato - 2017

Keywords

  • PFAPA syndrome

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