Association of national smoke-free policies with per-capita cigarette consumption and acute myocardial infarction mortality in Europe

Michele Sassano, Marco Mariani, Roberta Pastorino*, Walter Ricciardi, Carlo La Vecchia, Stefania Boccia

*Autore corrispondente per questo lavoro

Risultato della ricerca: Contributo in rivistaArticolo in rivista

Abstract

Background Evidence on the association between smoke-free policies and per-capita cigarette consumption and mortality due to acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in Europe is limited. Hence, we aimed to assess this association and to evaluate which factors influence it.Methods We performed an interrupted time series analysis, including 27 member states of the European Union and the UK, on per-capita cigarette consumption and AMI mortality. A multivariate meta-regression was used to assess the potential influence of other factors on the observed associations.Methods We performed an interrupted time series analysis, including 27 member states of the European Union and the UK, on per-capita cigarette consumption and AMI mortality. A multivariate meta-regression was used to assess the potential influence of other factors on the observed associations.Results Around half of the smoke-free policies introduced were associated with a level or slope change, or both, of per-capita cigarette consumption and AMI mortality (17 of 35). As for cigarette consumption, the strongest level reduction was observed for the smoking ban issued in 2010 in Poland (rate ratio (RR): 0.47; 95% CI: 0.41, 0.53). Instead, the largest level reduction of AMI mortality was observed for the intervention introduced in 2012 in Bulgaria (RR: 0.38; 95% CI: 0.34, 0.42). Policies issued more recently or by countries with a lower human development index were found to be associated with a larger decrease in per-capita cigarette consumption. In addition, smoking bans applying to bars had a stronger inverse association with both cigarette consumption and AMI mortality.Results Around half of the smoke-free policies introduced were associated with a level or slope change, or both, of per-capita cigarette consumption and AMI mortality (17 of 35). As for cigarette consumption, the strongest level reduction was observed for the smoking ban issued in 2010 in Poland (rate ratio (RR): 0.47; 95% CI: 0.41, 0.53). Instead, the largest level reduction of AMI mortality was observed for the intervention introduced in 2012 in Bulgaria (RR: 0.38; 95% CI: 0.34, 0.42). Policies issued more recently or by countries with a lower human development index were found to be associated with a larger decrease in per-capita cigarette consumption. In addition, smoking bans applying to bars had a stronger inverse association with both cigarette consumption and AMI mortality.Conclusions The results of our study suggest that smoke-free policies are effective at reducing per-capita cigarette consumption and AMI mortality. It is extremely important to monitor and register data on tobacco, its prevalence and consumption to be able to tackle its health effects with concerted efforts.
Lingua originaleEnglish
pagine (da-a)N/A-N/A
RivistaJournal of Epidemiology and Community Health
DOI
Stato di pubblicazionePubblicato - 2024

Keywords

  • CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES
  • HEALTH POLICY
  • PREVENTION
  • PUBLIC HEALTH
  • SMOKING

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