Anton Marty’s philosophy of language and his dialogue with linguists

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Abstract

Marty (1847-1914), a Swiss pupil of the philosopher Franz Brentano, was called to the German University in Prague in 1880. According to Brentano’s ‘empirical standpoint’, he devoted a great deal of his philosophy of language to descriptive semasiology. His model intertwines general grammar, logic and psychology. Two case studies are considered: the theory of judgment vs. sentences without subjects, and the theory of relationships vs. case theories. He wishes to establish agreement with linguists he feels close to, both because of their knowledge of linguistic facts and rules and because they, too, are keen on the enquiry regarding language functions and invariant structures: which remains a desirable objective.
Lingua originaleEnglish
Titolo della pubblicazione ospiteHistory of Linguistics 2014. Selected Papers from the 13th International Conference on the History of Language Sciences (ICHOLS XIII), Vila Real, Portugal, 25-29 August 2014
EditorC Assunçao, G Fernandes
Pagine163-175
Numero di pagine13
DOI
Stato di pubblicazionePubblicato - 2016

Serie di pubblicazioni

NomeAMSTERDAM STUDIES IN THE THEORY AND HISTORY OF LINGUISTIC SCIENCE. SERIES 3, STUDIES IN THE HISTORY OF THE LANGUAGE SCIENCES

Keywords

  • Anton Marty
  • case theories
  • descriptive semasiology
  • grammar
  • linguistics
  • logic
  • philosophy of language
  • psychology
  • sentences without subjects
  • theory of judgment
  • theory of relationships

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