"Ueber Gedichte ist schwer reden". Max Kommerell e l'essenza della lirica.

Translated title of the contribution: [Autom. eng. transl.] "It's hard to talk about poems". Max Kommerell e l'essenza della lirica.

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Abstract

This essay restores due attention to the figure of Max Kommerell (1902-1944), poet and scholar, an interlocutor of, among others, Martin Heidegger and Hans Georg Gadamer, and an essayist appreciated by Walter Benjamin. Kommerell knew how to blend philological rigour with poetic finesse and created “an oasis for the spirit”, in the universities in which he taught, Frankfurt and Marburg, under the weight of the Nazi burden, as his pupils testified, free from any ideological contamination and with an anachronistic openness to “Weltliteratur”. This contribution specifically illustrates theoretical reflection on Kommerell’s poetry and hermeneutic method, showing its originality with regard to the trend of the times, his aversion to a positivist approach towards poetry, but also, courageously, to the ideological restrictions of the times, as well as his distance from the elitist symbolist conception of the poetry of Georgian nature, which Kommerell had worked in for nine years, but which he made a dramatic decision to move away from; very different from his identification, Einfühlung, of a Diltheyan nature and immune to any arbitrary form of subjectivity, Kommerell’s “method” is based on absolute respect for the poetic word and on the conviction that the human soul and art are complementary.
Translated title of the contribution[Autom. eng. transl.] "It's hard to talk about poems". Max Kommerell e l'essenza della lirica.
Original languageItalian
Pages (from-to)79-97
Number of pages19
JournalLINKS
VolumeVI 2006
Publication statusPublished - 2007

Keywords

  • Lirica, poetica
  • Lyrik
  • Max Kommerell

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