The role of molecular typing and perfect match transfusion in sickle cell disease and thalassaemia: An innovative transfusion strategy

Rossana Putzulu, Nicola Piccirillo, Nicoletta Orlando, Giuseppina Massini, Maddalena Maresca, Fernando Scavone, Bianca Maria Ricerca Storti, Gina Zini Tanzi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Chronic red blood cell transfusions remain an essential part of supportive treatment in patients with thalassaemia and sickle cell disease (SCD). Red blood cell (RBC) transfusions expose patients to the risk of developing antibodies: RBC alloimmunization occurs when the immune system meets foreign antigens. We created a register of extensively genotyped donors to achieve a better matched transfusion in order to reduce transfusion alloimmunization. Extended RBC antigen typing was determined and confirmed by molecular biology techniques using Human Erythrocyte Antigen (HEA) BeadChip (BioArray Solutions Ltd., Warren, NJ) in periodic blood donors and in patients with thalassaemia and SCD. During 3 years, we typed extensively 1220 periodic blood donors, 898 male and 322 female. We also studied 10 hematologic patients affected by thalassaemia and sickle cell disease referred to our institution as candidate to periodic transfusions. Our patients (8 females and 2 males with a median age of 48 years, range 24–76 years), extensively typed using molecular techniques and screened for RBC alloantibodies, were transfused with a median of 33.5 RBC units. After three years of molecular typing, the “perfect match” transfusion strategy avoided new alloantibodies development in all studied patients.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)234-237
Number of pages4
JournalTransfusion and Apheresis Science
Volume56
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

Keywords

  • Alloimmunization
  • Genotyping
  • Hematology
  • RBC antigens and antibodies
  • Transfusion strategy

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