The “Big Two” in political communication: The effects of attacking and defending politicians’ leadership and morality

Mauro Maria Bertolotti, Patrizia Catellani, Karen M. Douglas, Robbie M. Sutton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In two experimental studies (conducted in Britain and Italy), participants read about a politician answering to leadership- versus morality-related allegations using either downward counterfactuals (“things could have been worse, if…”) or upward counterfactuals (“things could have been better, if…”). Downward messages increased the perception of the politician’s leadership, while both downward and upward messages increased morality perception. Political sophistication moderated the effect of message direction, with downward messages increasing perceived morality in low sophisticates and upward messages increasing perceived morality in high sophisticates. In the latter group, the acknowledgement of a responsibility-taking intent mediated morality judgment. Results were consistent across different countries, highlighting previously unexplored effects of communication on the perception of the “Big Two” dimensions.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)117-128
Number of pages12
JournalSocial Psychology
Volume2013
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

Keywords

  • counterfactual communication
  • political sophistication
  • social perception

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