Skewed T-cell receptor repertoire: more than a marker of malignancy, a tool to dissect the immunopathology of inflammatory diseases

Rossella Cianci, Gabriele Di Sante, Francesco Ria, Franco Pandolfi, Fabio Casciano, Tiziana Maria Angela De Pasquale, Raffaele Landolfi, D Pagliari, Jt Kurnick

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The highly diverse heterodimeric surface T cell receptor (TCR) gives the T lymphocyte its specificity for MHC-bound peptides needed to initiate antigen-recognition. In normal peripheral blood, spleen and lymph nodes, the TCR repertoire of the T lymphocytes is usually polyclonal. However, in malignancies such as leukemias, as well as in lymphoproliferative diseases of mature T cells, the TCR is a reflection of the clonality of the malignant cells and is therefore monoclonal. Several clinical conditions (mainly solid tumors and autoimmune diseases) have been described where the TCR repertoire is restricted. The ability to demonstrate clonal TCR usage provides a useful tool to dissect the immunopathology of inflammatory diseases. In this review we discuss these findings and propose to sub-divide diseases with restricted TCR repertoire into a group of conditions in which there is a known TCR ligand, as opposed to diseases in which the restricted TCR repertoire is the result of impaired T-cell development. This classification sheds light on the pathogenesis of several inflammatory diseases.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)153-161
Number of pages9
JournalJOURNAL OF BIOLOGICAL REGULATORS & HOMEOSTATIC AGENTS
Volume25
Publication statusPublished - 2011

Keywords

  • Autoimmune Diseases
  • Biological Markers
  • Gene Rearrangement, T-Lymphocyte
  • Genetic Variation
  • Humans
  • Inflammation
  • Lymphocyte Activation
  • Major Histocompatibility Complex
  • Neoplasms
  • Receptors, Antigen, T-Cell
  • Spleen
  • T-Cell Antigen Receptor Specificity
  • T-Lymphocyte Subsets
  • T-Lymphocytes

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