Recurrence of angina after ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction: the role of coronary microvascular obstruction

Antonino Maria Tommaso Buffon, Francesco Burzotta, Carlo Trani, Filippo Crea, Rocco Antonio Montone, Marco Giuseppe Del Buono, Maria Chiara Meucci, Massimiliano Camilli, Antonio Maria Leone, Cristina Aurigemma, Giampaolo Niccoli, V Vetrugno, G Santacroce, M Galli, D D'Amariol

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: The recurrence of angina after percutaneous coronary intervention affects 20-35% of patients with stable coronary artery disease; however, few data are available in the setting of ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction. We evaluated the relation between coronary microvascular obstruction and the recurrence of angina at follow-up.Methods: We prospectively enrolled patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention. Microvascular obstruction was defined as thrombolysis in myocardial infarction flow less than 3 or 3 with myocardial blush grade less than 2. The primary endpoint was the recurrence of angina at follow-up. Moreover, angina status was evaluated by the Seattle angina questionnaire summary score (SAQSS). Therapy at follow-up and the occurrence of major adverse cardiovascular events were also collected.Results: We enrolled 200 patients. Microvascular obstruction occurred in 52 (26%) of them. Follow-up (mean time 25.17 +/- 9.28 months) was performed in all patients. Recurrent angina occurred in 31 (15.5%) patients, with a higher prevalence in patients with microvascular obstruction compared with patients without microvascular obstruction (13 (25.0%) vs. 18 (12.2%), P=0.008). Accordingly, SAQSS was lower and the need for two or more anti-anginal drugs was higher in patients with microvascular obstruction compared with patients without microvascular obstruction. At multiple linear regression analysis a history of previous acute coronary syndrome and the occurrence of microvascular obstruction were the only independent predictors of a worse SAQSS. Finally, the occurrence of major adverse cardiovascular events was higher in patients with microvascular obstruction compared with patients without microvascular obstruction.Conclusions: The recurrence of angina in ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction patients treated with primary percutaneous coronary intervention is an important clinical issue. The occurrence of microvascular obstruction portends a worse angina status and is associated with the use of more anti-anginal drugs.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)_-_
JournalEUROPEAN HEART JOURNAL. ACUTE CARDIOVASCULAR CARE
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

Keywords

  • Angina
  • STEMI
  • microvascular obstruction
  • primary PCI

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