Prime esperienze di coltivazione della Quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) in Pianura Padana

Translated title of the contribution: [Autom. eng. transl.] First experiences of cultivation of Quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) In the Po Valley

Vincenzo Tabaglio, Dora Ines Melo Ortiz, Cristina Ganimede, Roberta Boselli, Alberto Vercesi

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

[Autom. eng. transl.] Chenopodium quinoa Willd. is a plant native to the Andean area, classified as a pseudocereal (Fleming and Galwey, 1995). Quinoa is a food crop that contains all the essential amino acids and is rich in trace elements (Krivonos, 2013). From the grain are obtained flours of good protein content (13-18%) and gluten-free, therefore useful in the diet of people with celiac disease. Moreover, thanks to the high adaptability and rusticity demonstrated also in environments different from those of origin, quinoa can represent an alternative culture in the face of climate change (Jacobsen, 2003) and have a certain role in contributing to global food security. In the search for alternative cultures and high nutritional value foods, an experimental study on the adaptability of quinoa in Northern Italy was undertaken. The first task is to identify the most suitable cultivars for the Po pedo-climatic conditions and the appropriate cultivation technique for its insertion into sustainable lowland and hill agrosystems. In the demonstration fields, Real Blanca and Real Roja exhibited a cycle of 130 and 150 days from the emergency, respectively in Val di Nizza and Castelnovetto. The yield of Real Roja in the latter location was 1040 kg ha-1 of dry grain, while in Val di Nizza 370 and 448 kg ha-1 were produced for Real Roja and Real Blanca respectively. In the catalog field, the average height of the plant was 205 (± 48) cm, the average length of the panicle was 73 (± 10) cm, while the yield ranged from 106 to 1290 kg ha-1. The most productive cultivar was Flc 6. Only 12 cultivars, among the 24 belonging to the varietal collection, reached physiological maturation (on average in 171 days), while the remaining ones did not go beyond the flowering stage, since their cycle vegetative was too long. Among the problems that emerged, it is worth highlighting the strong competition with some weeds, in particular with Chenopodium album, Echinochloa crus-galli and Sorghum halepense. Some attacks of Peronospora spp. Have also been reported. These results suggest that some quinoa cultivars can be successfully grown in Northern Italy, but it is necessary to continue the search for the most suitable varieties, as well as the most suitable cultivation technique.
Translated title of the contribution[Autom. eng. transl.] First experiences of cultivation of Quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) In the Po Valley
Original languageItalian
Title of host publicationAtti del XLIV Convegno Nazionale della Società Italiana di Agronomia “L’Agronomia per la gestione dei sistemi produttivi agrari”, Bologna (Italia), 14-16 settembre 2015. (v. 174)
Pages174
Number of pages1
Publication statusPublished - 2015
EventXLIV Convegno Nazionale della Società Italiana di Agronomia “L’Agronomia per la gestione dei sistemi produttivi agrari” - Bologna
Duration: 14 Sept 201516 Sept 2015

Conference

ConferenceXLIV Convegno Nazionale della Società Italiana di Agronomia “L’Agronomia per la gestione dei sistemi produttivi agrari”
CityBologna
Period14/9/1516/9/15

Keywords

  • Chenopodium quinoa
  • quinoa

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