Pastore di anime. Monde Catholique et médias des années Cinquante aux années Soixante

Translated title of the contribution: [Autom. eng. transl.] Pastore di anime. Catholic world and media from the Fifties to the Sixties

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

During the second half of the Fifties media policies of the Italian Catholic Church takes a new turn. This change will have a significant influence on the development of the media in Italy, and especially it will be decisive for the movement of the media system center of gravity from cinema and film to TV. This contribution analyze this important circumstance through the analysis of the documents of the Magisterium of the Church and of the actions that the Catholics did in this period and which would be crucial to decide the next steps in the history of the Italian media. The essay will examine, therefore, the attitude and position of the Catholics about media in these years, identifying four principal coordinates that synthesize complex cultural politics of the Italian Church: the bringing into question of the educational values of cinema and film; the awareness of the limits of a pedagogy focused on the public and on the moment of vision; the abandon of cinema productive project and the engagement of the Catholics in television. In this situation there emerges a new educational project on the media, including the Catholic University will be the main performer.
Translated title of the contribution[Autom. eng. transl.] Pastore di anime. Catholic world and media from the Fifties to the Sixties
Original languageFrench
Title of host publicationIl cinema si impara? Can we learn cinema?
EditorsAnna Bertolli, Andrea Mariani, Martina Panelli
Pages59-65
Number of pages7
Publication statusPublished - 2013

Keywords

  • CATHOLICS AUDIENCE
  • CINEMA AND CATHOLICS
  • CULTURAL POLITICIES
  • MEDIA LITERACY

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