New insights into the lipidomic response of CaCo-2 cells to differently cooked and in vitro digested extra-virgin olive oils

Julián Lozano-Castellón, Gabriele Rocchetti*, Anna Vallverdú-Queralt, Franco Lucchini, Gianluca Giuberti, Xavier Torrado-Prat, Montserrat Illán, Rosa Mª Lamuela-Raventós, Luigi Lucini*

*Corresponding author

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The health benefits of extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) are far proven. However, considering that this oil is consumed also cooked, this work aimed to evaluate the impact of different cooking techniques on human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells (Caco-2) exposed to in vitro digested EVOO. In particular, the effect of different cooking methods, namely sauteing, deep-frying, and Roner , was assayed and compared to a raw EVOO sample. The Caco-2 cell lysates were analyzed through an untargeted lipidomics approach, and multivariate statistics were used to identify the marker compounds of the differences in cells’ lipidomic signatures. Despite representing the cooking at the lowest temperature (but longer time), cells exposed to Roner  cooked EVOO presented the most distinguished lipidomic profile. The markers of differences in Caco-2 could be related to oxidative stress-related compounds such as oxidized glutathione, diketogulonic acid, ceramides, and diglycerides. Taken together, our findings indicate that the differences in EVOO composition determined by cooking could impose significant lipidomic perturbation on the human intestinal cells.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)111030-111030
Number of pages1
JournalFood Research International
Volume155
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2022

Keywords

  • foodomics
  • lipid oxidation

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'New insights into the lipidomic response of CaCo-2 cells to differently cooked and in vitro digested extra-virgin olive oils'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this