Morti invano? I figli delle vittime degli Anni di Piombo: fattori famigliari e sociali nell’elaborazione traumatica del lutto

Translated title of the contribution: [Autom. eng. transl.] Dead in vain? The children of the victims of the Lead Years: family and social factors in the traumatic elaboration of mourning

Camillo Regalia, Sara Pelucchi

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

[Autom. eng. transl.] The present contribution wanted to explore the suffering process of re-elaboration of the meaning and meaning of mourning in 26 adult subjects who lost their father more than forty years ago in an attack or in a terrorist massacre that took place during the Years of Lead. The qualitative analysis of the interviews carried out allowed the evidence of clusters describing different types of reworking paths of the loss suffered. The subsequent quantitative analysis of the data showed instead that the different processes of family reworking and social signification of the subjects are differently connected with the current well-being of the subjects, investigated in terms of social trust, positive expectation in the future, individual well-being and presence of reactivation post-traumatic.
Translated title of the contribution[Autom. eng. transl.] Dead in vain? The children of the victims of the Lead Years: family and social factors in the traumatic elaboration of mourning
Original languageItalian
Title of host publicationAIP- XIV Congresso Nazionale della Sezione di Psicologia sociale
Pages142-143
Number of pages2
Publication statusPublished - 2016
EventAIP- XIV Congresso Nazionale della Sezione di Psicologia sociale - Napoli
Duration: 22 Sep 201624 Sep 2016

Conference

ConferenceAIP- XIV Congresso Nazionale della Sezione di Psicologia sociale
CityNapoli
Period22/9/1624/9/16

Keywords

  • terrorism

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