Mondo disponibile e mondo prodotto. Rudolf Pannwitz filosofo

Translated title of the contribution: [Autom. eng. transl.] Available world and produced world. Rudolf Pannwitz philosopher

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Abstract

[Autom. eng. transl.] Rudolf Pannwitz (1881-1969) is one of the most complex, but often undervalued intellectual figures in the German-speaking area, a linguistically savory author of a huge and multi-faceted bibliography, which has brought to life the esteem of the most important personalities on the cultural scene European. Nor can we ignore a contrasted, suffered, eccentric biography, which only in its last phase (coinciding with the second post-war period) will allow a mature arrangement of thought. This volume completely reconstructs the Pannwitzian philosophical doctrine for the first time; that philosophy which for self-declaration turns out to be the category to which the most important person has expressed belongs. The definitive formulation coincides with the great diptych of maturity - consisting of the works "Der Aufbau der Natur" and "Das Werk des Menschen" - which introduces the fundamental distinction between the available world and the product world. But Pannwitz is also a great European. Particular attention is then given to his political philosophy, whose prophetic character is in some passages surprising, and which proposes solutions that anticipate in a passionate and vibrant way the cornerstones of the debate to come. In the first Italian translation with a German original, the text "Aufgaben Europas", a public report given by Pannwitz in 1955, is proposed in the appendix.
Translated title of the contribution[Autom. eng. transl.] Available world and produced world. Rudolf Pannwitz philosopher
Original languageItalian
PublisherVita e Pensiero
Number of pages256
ISBN (Print)978-88-343-1624-5
Publication statusPublished - 2007

Keywords

  • Storia della filosofia

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