L'Egitto visto dall'Etiopia: una vicenda politico-religiosa del '900

Translated title of the contribution: [Autom. eng. transl.] Egypt seen from Ethiopia: a political-religious story of the 1900s

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Abstract

The essay deals with the evolution of the secular bond that bound Ethiopia to Egypt from a religious and ecclesiastical point of view. In the face of the modernization started by the last emperor Hailè Selassiè from the 1920s, the constraint presented itself as an increasingly evident obstacle, since it subjected the Orthodox Church of Ethiopia to the institutional decisions of the Egyptian Coptic Church and represented a channel of interference not only religious, but also political. Faced with the fascist invasion of 1935-36, Egypt and its Church sided with Ethiopia. This did not eliminate the aspiration to autocephaly, manifested both by the emperor and by the high Ethiopian clergy, on which the initiative of fascist Italy acted before and during the occupation of Ethiopia of 1935-1936, imposing force on the breaking the bond with Egypt and submitting the Ethiopian Church to the colonial regime. Returned to power during the Second World War, in 1941, Hailè Selassiè re-established the bond to reach a solution, through diplomatic channels, in 1959. Autocephaly was an important element to consolidate the Ethiopian confessional state in the face of the affirmation Pan-Arab Egypt of Nasser, who did not renounce the interference with the Horn of Africa, in particular with support for the Eritrean secessionist struggle.
Translated title of the contribution[Autom. eng. transl.] Egypt seen from Ethiopia: a political-religious story of the 1900s
Original languageItalian
Pages (from-to)355-361
Number of pages7
JournalANNALI DELLA FONDAZIONE UGO LA MALFA
VolumeXXV
Publication statusPublished - 2011

Keywords

  • Egitto
  • Etiopia
  • Politica

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