Indagine di prevalenza sulle infezioni correlate all’assistenza in un Policlinico Universitario.

Translated title of the contribution: [Autom. eng. transl.] Prevalence survey of healthcare-related infections in a University Polyclinic.

Gualtiero Ricciardi, Gianfranco Damiani, Patrizia Laurenti, Andrea Gentili, Andrea Barbara, Filippo Berloco, Maria Incoronata Corbo, Sara Vincenti, Andrea Cambieri, La Milia Daniele Ignazio, G Vangi

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

[Autom. eng. transl.] INTRODUCTION Care-related infections (ICAs) represent one of the most frequent complications of hospital services and at the same time one of the country's main public health challenges. In order to better delineate the impact, active surveillance activities through prevalence and incidence surveys are fundamental.MATERIALS AND METHODS From 11 to 13 October 2017, a punctual prevalence survey on nosocomial infections Information was acquired on the presence of risk factors for the onset of hospital infections (surgical interventions in the 30 days prior to the detection, origin from a nursing home, RSA or dialysis centers in the last 90 days, isolation of MDR microorganisms in the last 90 days, presence of a permanent urinary catheter, antibiotic therapy, type of isolated microorganisms). A special software was used for the detection. RESULTS 1106 patients were enrolled. In 2017, there were 34 patients with at least one ICA, for a total of 35 cases (62 cases in 2016, 5.48% prevalence; p = 0.025) while the overall prevalence of ICA was 3.16%. The prevalence for the type of Specialty according to ECDC classification proved higher in the Medical Area (4.72%) with 22 cases of ICA detected. The decrease compared to 2016 appears more interesting in the surgical specialty departments (7.5% in 2016 vs 1.78% in 2017; p = 0.002) and, although not significant, in those of the gynecological specialty (5, 7% in 2016 vs 2.3% in 2017; p = 0.247) and in intensive care (8.2% in 2016 vs 4.35% in 2016; p = 0.231). As regards the type of ICA, infections of the bloodstream, with 11 cases, constitute the most frequent type (0.99%), followed by pneumonia with 9 cases (0.81%) and Urinary tract infections with 8 cases (0.72%). 2016, there is a significant decrease in surgical site infections (6 cases in 2017 vs 23 cases in 2016; p = 0.002) and, insignificant, urinary tract infections (8 cases in 2017 vs 16 cases in 2016; p = 0.113). CONCLUSION The study, although with the limits of the punctual prevalence investigations, seems to highlight the effectiveness of some preventive measures implemented in the setting under surveillance nce. More solid information on the data of the surgical site infections will be acquired with an incidence study that will rotate and affect all the surgical departments of the hospital scheduled for the period 2018-2020.
Translated title of the contribution[Autom. eng. transl.] Prevalence survey of healthcare-related infections in a University Polyclinic.
Original languageItalian
Title of host publicationAtti del 51° Congresso Nazionale della Società Italiana di Igiene, Medicina Preventiva e Sanità Pubblica (SItI) “I primi 40 anni del Servizio Sanitario Nazionale: il contributo dell’igiene alla salute e all’equità”
Pages268
Number of pages1
Publication statusPublished - 2018
EventAtti del 51° Congresso Nazionale della Società Italiana di Igiene, Medicina Preventiva e Sanità Pubblica (SItI) “I primi 40 anni del Servizio Sanitario Nazionale: il contributo dell’igiene alla salute e all’equità” - Riva del Garda Centro Congressi
Duration: 17 Oct 201820 Oct 2018

Conference

ConferenceAtti del 51° Congresso Nazionale della Società Italiana di Igiene, Medicina Preventiva e Sanità Pubblica (SItI) “I primi 40 anni del Servizio Sanitario Nazionale: il contributo dell’igiene alla salute e all’equità”
CityRiva del Garda Centro Congressi
Period17/10/1820/10/18

Keywords

  • infezioni

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of '[Autom. eng. transl.] Prevalence survey of healthcare-related infections in a University Polyclinic.'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this