Immaginazione e religione nell'"Introduzione alla vita beata" di Johann Gottlieb Fichte: il dire; l'immaginare; l'essere

Translated title of the contribution: [Autom. eng. transl.] Imagination and religion in Johann Gottlieb Fichte's "Introduction to the Blessed Life": the saying; imagining; Being

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

[Autom. eng. transl.] The Fichtian reading of the religious phenomenon assumes a clearly speculative curvature in the Introduction to the blessed life. The whole first part of the work argues around and in support of a precise ontological thesis: being is purely, unconditionally by virtue of itself, as a quiet identity that invariably is and subsists; the image of this being, in itself absolutely existent, is its very existence, it is knowledge and representation. In short, there is being: outside of it only that "non" of it, that kind of non-being which is knowledge. But the latter, knowledge, is the divine existence itself in the only way we can say and form an image of it. The existence of being is its only conceivable-representable form, its only icon. Here all the science and the possible conscience: instituted in the difference that subsists as a finite perspective, in the distinction on which the differing, the diversity and the connection relaxes. There is knowledge exclusively in and of difference, in and of the figure, in and of consciousness. Consciousness is "as" a formal-imaginal relationship with the being that does not become or disperse, with the being that, spreading, becomes eventualized and takes on a luminous form. Only the representable is thinkable: thought is not a thought of being sic et simpliciter, but of being "as" is; not of the unconditionedness of being but of the determination that, characterizing it "as" being, expresses it while revealing it, and saying it denies any "saying". Knowledge is, qua talis, image, icon. There is no knowable and expressible form except in so far as it has an imaginal tenor, a representative nature. Imagination shows itself once again, though with different traits from those possessed in the first Fichtian Grundlage, an inescapable concept to confront and discuss being and knowledge.
Translated title of the contribution[Autom. eng. transl.] Imagination and religion in Johann Gottlieb Fichte's "Introduction to the Blessed Life": the saying; imagining; Being
Original languageItalian
Title of host publicationJ.G. FICHTE, Introduzione alla vita beata
EditorsFRANCO BUZZI
Pages15-51
Number of pages37
Publication statusPublished - 2004

Keywords

  • Absolut
  • Assoluto
  • Bild
  • Dasein
  • Ein
  • Einbildungskraft
  • J.G. Fichte
  • Uno
  • esistenza
  • immaginazione
  • immagine

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