Guerra all'Impero, guerra ai cristiani: le radici della dissoluzione dell'Impero ottomano

Translated title of the contribution: [Autom. eng. transl.] War on the Empire, war on the Christians: the roots of the dissolution of the Ottoman Empire

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Historiography has often described the dissolution of the vast Ottoman empire as consequences of the First World War and as a result of the peace treaties. This approach, however, does not consider the profound processes that affected the Ottoman state and society between the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Geopolitical changes, the transformations of society and the reforms of the state were at the origin of changes destined to modify above all the delicate balances of a plural society, founded on a complex cohabitative dynamic. Ottoman pluralism and its crisis therefore represents not simply a descriptive category, but an important key to understanding the crisis and dissolution of a secular empire.
Translated title of the contribution[Autom. eng. transl.] War on the Empire, war on the Christians: the roots of the dissolution of the Ottoman Empire
Original languageItalian
Title of host publicationLa lunga guerra. I Balcani e il Caucaso tra conflitto mondiale e conflitti locali (1912-1923)
Pages29-41
Number of pages13
Publication statusPublished - 2020
EventBefore and After First World War: The Balkans and Caucasus between 1912 and 1923 - Milano, Università degli Studi
Duration: 8 Nov 20189 Nov 2020

Conference

ConferenceBefore and After First World War: The Balkans and Caucasus between 1912 and 1923
CityMilano, Università degli Studi
Period8/11/189/11/20

Keywords

  • Comunità Cristiane
  • Eastern Christians
  • First World War
  • Impero ottomano
  • Ottoman Empire
  • Pluralism
  • Pluralismo
  • Prima Guerra Mondiale

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