Giovan Battista Strozzi il Giovane a Roma: la 'Lezione in biasmo della superbia' (1611)

Translated title of the contribution: [Autom. eng. transl.] Giovan Battista Strozzi the Younger in Rome: the 'Lesson in Blame for Pride' (1611)

Francesco Rossini

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The paper focuses on the Roman stays of the Florentine man of letters Giovan Battista Strozzi “il Giovane”, also known as “il Cieco”. The essay deals with the time span between the first Roman stay (1590-1595) and his return to Rome in 1624. In the first period, at the Congregation of the Oratory of St. Philip Neri, he became friend with Antonio Gallonio, the Paduan man of letters Antonio Querenghi and Federico Borromeo. In his second Roman stay, Strozzi was officially invited to the papal court by Urban VIII. Between these two extremes, throughout the first two decades of the seventeenth century, there were several residential periods during which Strozzi came in contact with the Academy of Umoristi and that of the Ordinati. During the assembly of the latter academy on April 6th, 1611, he pronounced (in the presence of illustrious listeners, including Galileo Galilei) a 'Lezione in biasmo della superbia': the last part of the paper is devoted to a detailed exegesis of this text
Translated title of the contribution[Autom. eng. transl.] Giovan Battista Strozzi the Younger in Rome: the 'Lesson in Blame for Pride' (1611)
Original languageItalian
Pages (from-to)733-762
Number of pages30
JournalAEVUM
Volume91
Publication statusPublished - 2017

Keywords

  • Italian literature, early modern italian studies, Giovan Battista Strozzi il Giovane, Oratory of Saint Philip Neri, Ordinati Academy, Galileo Galilei, pride
  • Letteratura italiana, Rinascimento italiano, Giovan Battista Strozzi il Giovane, Oratorio di san Filippo Neri, Accdemia degli Ordinati, Galileo Galilei, superbia

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