Fonti e lessico dell’ontologia kantiana. I corsi di metafisica (1762-1795)

Translated title of the contribution: [Autom. eng. transl.] Sources and lexicon of Kantian ontology. Metaphysics courses (1762-1795)

Research output: Book/ReportBook

Abstract

[Autom. eng. transl.] Despite the term "ontology" does not appear with particular frequency in Kant's printed writings, he compares extensively with this concept both in the precritical phase of his thinking and in the crucial passages of the critical turn. In the academic manuals in use in eighteenth-century Germany, the expositionis agreement of metaphysics follows the Wolffian model, in which ontology represents general metaphysics, followed by special metaphysics, composed of cosmology, psychology and theology. During his teaching activity, which spans the second half of the eighteenth century, Kant chooses to hold his own metaphysical lessons by commenting on the Metaphysica of AG Baumgarten. It is a text that, while following the Wolffian general approach, distances itself in different aspects, often seeking original solutions to the cardinal principles of metaphysics. Commenting on this text, Kant has the opportunity to broaden the scope of his own analysis, confronting himself with the protagonists of the metaphysical debate of his time and questioning the very status of metaphysics and its method. The "laboratory" of the lessons allows us to recognize the order underlying many of the methodological passages that lead to the critical conception of the transcendental, the cornerstone in the Kantian rethinking of metaphysics.
Translated title of the contribution[Autom. eng. transl.] Sources and lexicon of Kantian ontology. Metaphysics courses (1762-1795)
Original languageItalian
PublisherETS
Number of pages270
ISBN (Print)9788846747389
Publication statusPublished - 2017

Keywords

  • Kant, Metafisica, Ontologie, Baumgarten, Filosofia trascendentale

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