Famiglia, distribuzione del reddito e politiche familiari: una survey della letteratura degli anni Novanta. Parte prima: I nuovi fenomeni e i vecchi squilibri delle politiche sociali

Translated title of the contribution: [Autom. eng. transl.] Family, income distribution and family policies: a survey of the literature of the nineties. Part one: New phenomena and old imbalances in social policies

Research output: Working paper

Abstract

[Autom. eng. transl.] The subject of this survey - which represents only the first part of a more complete work that aims to critically examine also the reform of welfare policies underway in Italy - is to summarize the main points of view with which Italian economists have addressed the issue family and family policies. In particular, we want to analyze the new phenomena that characterize the distribution of income and poverty and relate them to the social policies that were in place in the 1990s and which were the subject of the reform project. Along these lines of reasoning, the survey will be divided into three parts: theoretical assessments on the cost of children and on the need for new social policies directly aimed at families with children; the distribution of income and the distributive effects of social policies for the family will be the specific object of the second part; while the reasons why most economists consider a welfare reform - more complex than the one currently under discussion - to be indispensable will constitute the conclusions of the present work.
Translated title of the contribution[Autom. eng. transl.] Family, income distribution and family policies: a survey of the literature of the nineties. Part one: New phenomena and old imbalances in social policies
Original languageItalian
Number of pages37
Publication statusPublished - 2000

Keywords

  • distribuzione reddito
  • famiglia
  • politiche sociali

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