Estimating the smoking ban effects on smoking prevalence, quitting and cigarette consumption in a population study of apprentices in Italy

Luca Salmasi, Luca Pieroni, Giacomo Muzi, Augusto Quercia, Donatella Lanari, Carmen Rundo, Liliana Minelli, Marco Dell’Omo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: We evaluated the effects of the Italian 2005 smoking ban in public places on the prevalence of smoking, quitting and cigarette consumption of young workers. Data and Methods: The dataset was obtained from non-computerized registers of medical examinations for a population of workers with apprenticeship contracts residing in the province of Viterbo, Italy, in the period 1996–2007. To estimate the effects of the ban, a segmented regression approach was used, exploiting the discontinuity introduced by the application of the law on apprentices’ smoking behavior. Results: It is estimated that the Italian smoking ban generally had no effect on smoking prevalence, quitting ratio, orcigarette consumption of apprentices. However, when the estimates were applied to subpopulations, significant effects were found: −1% in smoking prevalence, +2% in quitting, and −3% in smoking intensity of apprentices with at least a diploma.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)9523-9535
Number of pages13
JournalInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Volume12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Keywords

  • Adolescent
  • Adult
  • Apprenticeship contracts
  • Cross-Sectional Studies
  • Female
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis
  • Humans
  • Inservice Training
  • Italy
  • Male
  • Occupational Health
  • Prevalence
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Segmented regression
  • Smoking
  • Smoking bans
  • Tobacco Products
  • Tobacco Smoke Pollution
  • Tobacco Use Cessation
  • Tobacco consumption
  • Young Adult

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