Effect of the inclusion of dry pasta by-products at different levels in the diet of typical Italian finishing heavy pigs: Performance, carcass characteristics, and ham quality

Aldo Prandini, Maurizio Moschini, Gianluca Giuberti, Samantha Sigolo, Mauro Morlacchini, M. Morlacchini

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The effect of pasta inclusion in finishing pig diets was evaluated on growth performance, carcass characteristics, and ham quality. Pigs (144) were assigned to 4 diets with different pasta levels: 0 (control, corn-based diet), 30, 60, or 80%. Pigs fed pasta had greater (linear, P < 0.01) feed intakes than controls. Pasta increased (quadratic, P < 0.01) carcass weight and dressing percentage reaching the highest values at 30% inclusion level, and reduced (linear, P < 0.01) the Longissimus thoracis et lumborum thickness. Pasta decreased (linear, P < 0.01) linoleic acid and polyunsaturated fatty acid levels in subcutaneous (fresh and seasoned hams) and intramuscular (seasoned hams) fat, and enhanced saturated fatty acid content in subcutaneous fat (fresh hams: quadratic, P < 0.01; seasoned hams: linear, P = 0.03). Proteolysis index, colour, weight losses, and sensory properties (excepted extraneous taste) of the hams were unaffected by the pasta. Pasta could be considered as an ingredient in the diet for typical Italian finishing heavy pigs.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)38-45
Number of pages8
JournalMeat Science
Volume114
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

Keywords

  • Adipose Tissue
  • Animal Feed
  • Animals
  • Body Composition
  • Body Weight
  • Carcass
  • Corn
  • Diet
  • Dietary Fats
  • Dry pasta by-product
  • Edible Grain
  • Energy Intake
  • Fatty Acids
  • Fatty Acids, Unsaturated
  • Food Science
  • Ham quality
  • Heavy pig
  • Humans
  • Italy
  • Linoleic Acid
  • Meat
  • Muscle, Skeletal
  • Performance
  • Subcutaneous Fat
  • Swine
  • Triticum
  • Zea mays

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