Does early withdrawal of life-sustaining treatment increase mortality after cardiac arrest?

Claudio Sandroni, Fabio Silvio Taccone

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The majority of patients who are admitted to the hospital after a successful resuscitation from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) die before hospital discharge. Most of these deaths are due to severe hypoxic–ischaemic brain injury1 and occur after withdrawal of life sustaining treatment (WLST) because a poor neurological prognosis is expected. When prognosticating a poor neurological outcome in patients who are unconscious after resuscitation from cardiac arrest the risk of a falsely pessimistic prediction should be minimised in order to avoid an inappropriate WLST. Since even the most robust predictors of poor neurological outcome are not 100% specific (e.g. some false positive may be expected), an integrated approach using multiple prognostic tests is recommended.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)A3-A4
Number of pages2
JournalResuscitation
Volume102
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

Keywords

  • Brain
  • Cardiac arrest
  • Glasgow Coma Scale
  • Heart Arrest
  • Humans
  • Hypoxia–ischaemia
  • Prognosis

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