Cose nuove e cose antiche

Translated title of the contribution: [Autom. eng. transl.] New things and old things

Samuele Pinna (Editor), Davide Riserbato (Editor)

Research output: Book/ReportOther report

Abstract

[Autom. eng. transl.] This volume collects some texts by Giacomo Biffi dating back to the years of his Milanese priestly ministry (1960-1975). In these pages we will find the same strength, passion and humor that constitute the "trademark" of the entire production of the Cardinal. New, young and fresh words will be found there, precisely because their source is ancient. It will be possible to appreciate the clear and concrete pastoral care of the parish priest Biffi, to grasp the ferments and hopes of the early post-conciliar years, to breathe the uncertainty and disorientation that society and the Church were experiencing in the years of "contestation". These were the years of the "economic miracle", of the "culture of work", but also years of crisis and fatal events, of "ideological, moral, ecclesiastical and social turmoil" (Memoirs and digressions of an Italian cardinal). Monthly cadenced and liturgically rhythmic, as it goes through the entire annual cycle of the seasons several times, with its reassuring monotonies but also with its surprising and often disorienting novelties, this reading is configured as a retrospective that - to use the words of the same Giacomo Biffi - «it gives us a sense of the continuity of the Church (…) above the change of men and circumstances. Beyond all that changes, "Christ is the same - as it is written - yesterday and today and for centuries" "(from inside the volume)
Translated title of the contribution[Autom. eng. transl.] New things and old things
Original languageItalian
PublisherCantagalli
Number of pages287
ISBN (Print)978-88-6879-506-1
Publication statusPublished - 2017
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Concilio, parrocchia, Legnano, Milano, Giacomo Biffi

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