Becoming mothers after cancer: Resilience as a protective factor for prenatal attachment and for negative moods during pregnancy

Chiara Ionio, Eleonora Mascheroni, Lucia Bonassi, Fedro Peccatori, Giuseppe Nastasi, Alessandra Liuzzo, Flavia Faccio, Camilla Pisoni, Gabriella Pravettoni

Research output: Contribution to journalMeeting Abstract

Abstract

Background: Resilience can be defined as the ability to positively deal with adverse conditions, to overcome difficulties while maintaining relatively good psychological and physical health. Although few studies have explored the psychological aspects of cancer during pregnancy it is plausible that a diagnosis of cancer might interfere with factors that are necessary to deal positively with an ongoing or future gestation. We aim to investigate the possible protective role of resilience in the construction of prenatal attachment and in the intensity of negative moods in pregnant women with a previous or concomitant cancer diagnosis. Methods: 26 pregnant women (25 with breast cancer, 1 with hepatic PEComa) have been enrolled during the last trimester of pregnancy. 20 had a pregnancy after cancer diagnosis, while 6 had cancer occurring during pregnancy. After informed consent, women filled out: the Resilience Scale for Adults, the Prenatal Attachment Inventory, and the Profile of Mood States. Results: Analyses showed positive correlations between resilience factors and prenatal attachment and negative correlations between resilience factors and negative mood states. In particular there was a significant correlation between Social resources and (a) quality of prenatal attachment (r= .44,p= .046), (b) intensity of attachment (r= .45,p= .036); a correlation between Planned future and (a) anxiety (r= -.52,p= .016), (b) fatigue (r= -.43,p= .046); a correlation between Family cohesion and (a) anxiety (r= -.71,p< .001), (b) depression (r= -.56,p= .006), (c) anger (r= -.67,p= .001); a correlation between Social resources and (a) anxiety (r= .45,p= .001). Conclusions: These preliminary data indicate that, it is important to assess resilience and family support in pregnant women with current or past experience of oncological diagnosis. Detailed analysis of which strategies and resources are activated will provide vital information for targeted interventions.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)e22156-e22156
JournalJournal of Clinical Oncology
Volume36
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

Keywords

  • cancer
  • pregnancy

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