Autorità e influenza. Il punto di vista della psicologia sociale e alcuni possibili vantaggi per la ricerca storica

Translated title of the contribution: [Autom. eng. transl.] Authority and influence. The point of view of social psychology and some possible advantages for historical research

Carlo Galimberti*, Marco Lecci

*Corresponding author

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

The paper retraces the process of construction of an historical point of view inside the Social Psychology field. Wilhelm Wundt and Sigmund Freud are indicated as the first two ‘social’ psychologist whose theories and papers represent a first relevant contributions to the development of an hisotrical perspective in Social Psychology. Subsequently, the work of Kenneth Gergen is presented to show how today we could refer to Social Psychology as History («Journal of personality and social psychology», 26/2 (1973), pp. 309-320: 312), to use the title of his first and more important paper on this topic. Consequences for the research in both History and Social Psychology research field are broadly presented and discussed. On the basis of the discussion of recent psycho-social models on authority and social influence (Kelman; Tyler and Huo), the second part of the paper presents an original interpretation of these models in the light of the Utterance Intersubjectivity Model (Galimberti, 2011; Galimberti, Brivio, and Cazzulani, 2012).
Translated title of the contribution[Autom. eng. transl.] Authority and influence. The point of view of social psychology and some possible advantages for historical research
Original languageItalian
Title of host publicationAutorità e consenso. Regnum e monarchia nell’europa medievale
EditorsMP Alberzoni, R Lambertini
Pages19-42
Number of pages24
Publication statusPublished - 2017

Keywords

  • Autorità
  • Influenza
  • Intersoggettività
  • Potere
  • Storia

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