Applying a deliberation model to the analysis of consultations in haemophilia: Implications for doctor-patient communication

Sarah Francesca Maria Bigi, Giulia Lamiani, Maria Elisa Mancuso, Antonio Coppola, Elena Vegni

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective Literature highlights the importance of communication in order to achieve patient's adherence. However, the specific dialogical components likely to favor patient adherence are not clear. In this study, the deliberation dialogue model was applied as an ideal model of optimal deliberation to real physician-patient consultations in the field of hemophilia in order to identify misalignments with the model and possible improvements in physician-patient communication. Methods By applying the deliberation model, we analyzed a corpus of 30 check-up consultations in hemophilia. Results Of 30 consultations, 24 (80%) contained 43 deliberation dialogues. Twenty-two (51%) deliberation dialogues were complete (e.g., included an opening stage with a clear statement of the problem, an argumentation stage in which both physician and patient participated, and a closing stage with an explicit patient commitment), whereas 21 (49%) deliberations were incomplete. These featured: Lack of/partial argumentation stage; Lack of closing stage; Lack of/partial argumentation stage and lack of closing stage. Conclusions The deliberation model can be applied to empirical data and allows to identify causes for suboptimal realizations of deliberation. Practice implications Once a problem is acknowledged, attention could be paid to engage hemophilic patients in the argumentation stages and elicit their explicit commitment.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)690-695
Number of pages6
JournalPatient Education and Counseling
Volume100
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

Keywords

  • Adolescent
  • Adult
  • Aged
  • Behavior change
  • Chronic care
  • Communication
  • Decision Making
  • Deliberation dialogue
  • Hemophilia
  • Hemophilia A
  • Humans
  • Medicine (all)
  • Middle Aged
  • Patient Participation
  • Patient-Centered Care
  • Patient-Centeredness
  • Physician-Patient Relations
  • Referral and Consultation
  • Shared decision making
  • Tape Recording
  • Young Adult

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