Acute pancreatitis in oldest old: a 10-year retrospective analysis of patients referred to the emergency department of a large tertiary hospital

Marcello Covino, Veronica Ojetti, Fausto Rosa, Francesco Franceschi, Sergio Alfieri, Giuseppe Quero, Claudio Fiorillo, Roberta Menghi, Vito Laterza, Marcello Candelli

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3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective Contrasting results are reported on the clinical course of acute pancreatitis (AP) in the geriatric population. The aim of this study is to compare the AP clinical outcomes between patients aged from 65 to 79 years and those over 80 years. Methods A total of 115 patients over 80 years (oldest old) were compared to a group of 236 patients aged 65–79 years (elderly). Clinicodemographic, biochemical, and radiological data were reviewed. The primary outcome was to compare the overall mortality. Secondary outcomes included intensive care unit (ICU) admission, in-hospital length of stay (LOS), and need for surgical procedures. Results Laboratory values at admission were similar between the two groups. Over 80 patients presented a lower rate of abdominal symptoms (68.7% vs. 81.4%; P = 0.008), a higher mortality (14.8% vs. 3.5%; P = 0.003), and ICU admission (13.9% vs. 3.8%; P = 0.001) rates. Median LOS was comparable between the two groups. Multivariate analysis identified age [odds ratio (OR): 3.56; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.502–8.46; P = 0.004], a higher Ranson score (OR: 3.22; 95% CI: 1.24–8.39; P = 0.016), and the absence of abdominal pain (OR: 2.94; 95% CI: 1.25–6.87; P = 0.013) as independent predictors of mortality. Conversely, only age (OR: 3.83; 95% CI: 1.55–9.44; P = 0.003) and a more severe AP (OR: 3.56; 95% CI: 1.95–6.89; P = 0.041) were recognized as influencing ICU admission. Only the operative treatment (OR: 2.805; 95% CI: 1.166–5.443; P = 0.037) was evidenced as independent risk factor for LOS (OR: 3.74; 95% CI: 1.031–6.16; P = 0.003). Conclusion Oldest old patients have a higher mortality and ICU admission rate as compared to the other subgroups of elderly. Early diagnosis and prompt treatment are key elements to improve outcomes in this frailer population.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)159-165
Number of pages7
JournalEUROPEAN JOURNAL OF GASTROENTEROLOGY & HEPATOLOGY
Volume2020
Publication statusPublished - 2020

Keywords

  • acute pancreatitis
  • emergency department
  • mortality
  • oldest old
  • outcomes

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