Abdominal thromboses of splanchnic, renal and ovarian veins

Valerio De Stefano, I. Martinelli

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Thromboses of abdominal veins outside the iliac-caval axis are rare but clinically relevant. Early deaths after splanchnic vein thrombosis occur in 5-30% of cases. Sequelae can be liver failure or bowel infarction after splanchnic vein thrombosis, renal insufficiency after renal vein thrombosis, ovarian infarction after ovarian vein thrombosis. Local cancer or infections are rare in Budd-Chiari syndrome, and common for other sites. Inherited thrombophilia is detected in 30-50% of patients. Myeloproliferative neoplasms are the main cause of splanchnic vein thrombosis: 20-50% of patients have an overt myeloproliferative neoplasm and/or carry the molecular marker JAK2 V617F. Renal vein thrombosis is closely related to nephrotic syndrome; finally, ovarian vein thrombosis can complicate puerperium. Heparin is used for acute treatment, sometimes in conjunction with systemic or local thrombolysis. Vitamin K-antagonists are recommended for 3-6 months, and long-term in patients with Budd-Chiari syndrome, unprovoked splanchnic vein thrombosis, or renal vein thrombosis with a permanent prothrombotic state such as nephrotic syndrome. (c) 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)253-264
Number of pages12
JournalBAILLIERE'S BEST PRACTICE IN CLINICAL HAEMATOLOGY
Volume25
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012

Keywords

  • THROMBOSES AT UNUSUAL SITES

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